ENGINEERING THE NEXT GENERATION OF PERFORMANCE CAR BY DYRR ARDASH

19 May 2020

High performance cars are undergoing a revolution. Increasingly manufacturers are offering electric models and over the next decade the idea of a flagship performance car will change from one powered by a combustion engine to something solely battery-powered.

It is already happening in the world of hypercars – just witness the Lotus Evija, a ground-breaking project we are proud to be technical partner on. And from the very top end of the market down, we see the rise in demand for high performance electric cars to be a major area of growth for Williams Advanced Engineering. 

With our experience in batteries through e-motorsport programmes such as Formula E, light-weighting through composites, aerodynamics, thermodynamics, systems integration and low volume production, it really is a sweet-spot for our capabilities – quite simply, we believe we’re at the cutting edge of energy storage, e-powertrains and system integration into performance platforms.

What’s key is our ability to provide a bespoke, rather than a “one-size-fits-all” approach. We can electrify an existing ICE model, make an electric version of an existing sports car even faster and more dynamically capable, or support on the development of something entirely new, starting from a blank sheet of paper.

We have a proven track record in creating concept cars to test public reaction, a one-off dynamic prototype in a matter of months (the Jaguar C-X75 went from project start to running test car in less than two years), or taking a brand all the way to low volume production, delivering a BEV to market at the right cost, with the right timing and the right performance.

Thanks to our Hyperbat battery manufacturing, a joint venture with Unipart, we can also up- scale production to cover volume – at full capacity the facility will have the capability to produce 10,000+ high performance, high voltage batteries. Technology such as the 48V hybrid will certainly have its place over the coming years in mainstream car production, but the OEMs have large expert teams working in-house in this area. That is their domain. WAE’s skillset sits firmly toward the opposite end of the spectrum. 

Following on from our FW-EVX modular e-platform concept, we’re already working on the next generation of e-platform and within a short time,  WAE will be able to offer car makers a range of scalable, commercially competitive, electric platforms, spanning a wide variety of applications, all the way up to the most rapid of electric hypercars.

And this relates back to our ability to offer the market a truly bespoke approach. Because if you’re a supercar manufacturer who wants to go electric, you can’t simply buy what you need off-the-shelf, in the way that you can buy a high-performance engine from a major manufacturer and install that directly into your chassis.

For new entrants to the market – as well as established players – being able to draw on the knowledge of WAE when it comes to a bespoke e-powertrain can crucially drop development time, getting a car from development to sale in record time.

The revolution is coming – and we’re very much looking forward to being part of it.

Dyrr Ardash - Senior Commercial Manager, Williams Advanced Engineering 

A graduate in Automotive Engineering at the University of Bolton, Dyrr has over 20 years of Automotive based industry experience. After starting his career in powertrain development at Ford Motor Company, Dyrr joined DENSO in 2001, where he led teams developing electronic powertrain control and fuel systems.  Prior to joining Williams Advanced Engineering, Dyrr held both Chief Engineer and Senior Commercial roles at Ricardo.

Throughout his career, he has been involved in winning and managing a number of high-profile global projects, ranging from passenger cars to construction equipment.

Dyrr joined Williams Advanced Engineering in 2018 where he is currently responsible for leading the Automotive Business Development Team. He is passionate about delivering solutions for future mobility challenges.